NMA: Nonprescription Medicines Academy

Yes, Fish Oil May Increase Prostate Cancer Risk

August 22nd, 2013

Results of a case–cohort study using data from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial confirm previous reports of increased prostate cancer risk among men with high blood concentrations of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Results of a case–cohort study using data from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial confirm previous reports of increased prostate cancer risk among men with high blood concentrations of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

The cases included 834 men diagnosed with prostate cancer (156 with high-grade cancer). The subcohort consisted of 1,393 men selected randomly at baseline and matched to case subjects on age and race. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations between fatty acids and prostate cancer risk overall and by grade.

Compared with men in the lowest quartiles of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid blood concentrations, men in the highest quartile had an overall 43% increase in the risk of prostate cancer (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09–1.88), with a 44% increase in the risk of low-grade prostate cancer (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.08–1.93) and a 71% increase in the risk of high-grade prostate cancer (HR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.00–2.94). All comparisons were statistically significant.

In combination with previous reports, these results suggest that long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may be involved in prostate tumorigenesis

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013;105:1132-41.